Health

Research

in Action

Introducing Health Research in Action

This year’s Health Research in Action highlights some of the many notable impacts and outcomes of the Health Research Board's work during 2020, from a timeline of our huge contribution to Ireland’s efforts to combat COVID-19, to the other important research we continued alongside this. Included are 22 success stories of wide-ranging health and social care research across four themes, all of which we will gradually share on this page. But do please remember that in the meantime you can download the full publication at the link above, or at the bottom of this page. 

Theme one: Improving health behaviour and healthcare processes

Success stories

1) SPECPREDICT: A new imaging tool to predict outcomes in cancer patients

2)  Health Behaviour Change Research Group at NUI Galway

We will be adding further success stories to this theme in the coming weeks, and will keep you updated. 

Theme two: Empowering diverse voices in health

Success stories

1) The patient perspective on improving day-to-day tasks with Multiple Sclerosis

2) IPPOSI – giving patients the skills and confidence to shape research

We will be adding further success stories to this theme in the coming weeks, and will keep you updated. 

Theme three: Better health in pregnancy, childhood and adolescence

Success stories

1) Stop the clot! Raising awareness of thrombosis in pregnancy

We will be adding further success stories to this theme in the coming weeks, and will keep you updated. 

Theme four: Gathering evidence for health policy and services

Success stories

1) Providing older people with care and their own front door - how is housing with support perceived? 

We will be adding further success stories to this theme in the coming weeks, and will keep you updated. 

Acknowledgments

Thanks to science writer Dr Claire O’Connell and our valued HRB and HRB-funded researchers for helping us compile this year's Health Research in Action. Sincere acknowledgement also to the public, patients and carers, as well as the health and social care professionals, that make so much of our work possible.

Join the conversation on Twitter or LinkedIn - #HealthResearchInAction