Interventions for fatigue in inflammatory bowel disease

Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) represents a group of chronic, progressive, complex
inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract, with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis the two most commonly recognised forms of IBD. These debilitating diseases are characterised by periods of relapse and remission, where individuals experience a wide range of symptoms including diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and rectal bleeding (Cronin & Shanahan, 2003). Over the last decade, the incidence and prevalence of IBD significantly increased and it is being recently recognised as a global long-term condition (Baumgart et al. 2011; Molodecky et al. 2012). Approximately 5 million people have a diagnosis of IBD worldwide, of which 2.5 to 3 million people are affected in Europe (European Federation of Crohn and Colitis Organisation [EFCCA], 2011; Burisch et al. 2013). At a national level, the Irish Society of Colitis and Crohn's Disease estimate the occurrence of IBD is approximately 15,000 people, with another 500 cases diagnosed annually (The Centre for Colorectal Disease, 2011). A European IMPACT survey commissioned by EFCCA in 2010 was undertaken to glean an international perspective of the impact of IBD on people's lives (n=4670) across 22 countries, including Ireland. It was found that 49% of people reported that their quality of life to be negatively affected by the disease. The survey found that 23% of Irish respondents (n=125) Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) represents a group of chronic, progressive, complex inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract, with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis the two most commonly recognised forms of IBD. Fatigue has been recently identified as the most burdensome symptom experienced by individuals with IBD (Farrell 2013). This debilitating symptom is particularly problematic during active disease with prevalence rates reported as high as 86% (Minderhoud et al. 2007). This review aims to assess the effect of interventions for fatigue in inflammatory bowel disease.

Award Date
19 September 2014
Award Value
€64,488
Principal Investigator
Dr Dawn Farrell
Host Institution
University College Cork
Scheme
Cochrane Training Fellowships