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MRSA

Download the MRSA research information leaflet and poster

Text from the MRSA information leaflet and poster.

Understanding and reducing hospital infections caused by MRSA

Leaflet text.

Levels of the antibiotic-resistant 'superbug' MRSA have fallen in Beaumont Hospital in recent years, according to a study that surveyed the bacterium both in patients and in the hospital ward environment.

The project screened hundreds of patients for MRSA and identified the presence of MRSA strains in the hospital environment to understand better how to control spread of infection caused by MRSA.

'Over the four years of the study there was a decline in the number of samples that we took from the environment that were positive for MRSA,' says Beaumont Hospital consultant microbiologist Prof Hilary Humphreys.

Screening all at-risk patients dramatically improves MRSA detection rates and the research also identified a better way to rapidly detect MRSA to improve the effective use of available resources: a rapid test meant that isolation rooms could be used more efficiently.

The study was carried out with the Dublin Dental School and Hospital Microbiology Unit/Trinity College Dublin, the Health Protection Surveillance Centre and the National MRSA Reference Laboratory based at St. James's Hospital.

Understanding and reducing hospital infections caused by MRSA

Poster text.
  • Research found reduced levels of MRSA in patients and the environment of Beaumont Hospital over a four-year period.
  • Screening all at risk patients dramatically improves MRSA detection rates.
  • Molecular testing of samples for MRSA gives rapid results and supports the more efficient use of isolation rooms.
  • State of the art molecular techniques permit detailed analysis of MRSA strains in hospitals and allow for the rapid identification of new strains that may be better adapted to cause infection.
  • An evaluation of decontamination agents showed that agents such as Ecasol are rapidly effective at destroying MRSA in the environment, but do not have the disadvantages of hydrogen peroxide.
  • The study was carried out with the Dublin Dental School and Hospital Microbiology Unit, Trinity College Dublin, the Health Protection Surveillance Centre and the National MRSA Reference Laboratory based at St. James's Hospital.

'Over the four years of the study there was a decline in the number of samples that we took from the environment that were positive for MRSA.' Prof Hillary Humphreys - Beaumont Hospital consultant microbiologist.

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